alert caret-right hud lock search menu close LinkedIn Youtube Twitter Facebook Skip to main content

Americans are starting to see Economic Impact Payments deposited directly in their bank accounts. These payments are sometimes referred to as stimulus payments or stimulus checks.

Americans who filed 2018 or 2019 tax returns with direct deposit information or who receive Social Security do not need to take action. They will automatically receive payment in their bank accounts.

If you are enrolled in American Federal Online Banking or Mobile Banking, you can check for your Economic Impact Payment anytime anywhere using any device.

‘Get My Payment’ Web App

The IRS has launched a separate online application called “Get My Payment.” This free app, which can also be found at IRS.gov, allows taxpayers, who filed their tax return in 2018 or 2019, but did not provide their banking information on their return, to submit direct deposit information so they can receive payments by direct deposit, as opposed to getting mailed a check.

“Get My Payment” is an online app that will display on any desktop, phone or tablet. It does not need to be downloaded from an app store. “Get My Payment” will also allow taxpayers to track the status of their payment.

“Get My Payment” cannot update bank account information after an Economic Impact Payment has been scheduled for delivery. To help protect against potential fraud, the tool also does not allow people to change bank account information already on file with the IRS.

The IRS does not initiate contact with taxpayers by email, text messages or social media channels to request personal or financial information.

Non-Filers

Non-filers can get their payment by using the IRS ”Non-Filers: Enter Payment Info Here” web portal and entering their bank account information.

Also, eligible Social Security beneficiaries and railroad retirement recipients who did not file a tax return in 2018 and 2019 will be automatically sent their economic impact payments, primarily electronically.

Regardless of how you receive your payment, the IRS will send you a mailed letter to the most current address they have on file approximately 15 days after it sends your payment.

Retiree Payments

The IRS also reminds retirees who do not normally have a requirement to file a tax return that no action on their part is needed to receive their economic impact payment.

Seniors should be especially careful during this period. The IRS reminds retirees – including recipients of Forms SSA-1099 and RRB-1099 − that no one from the IRS will be reaching out to them by phone, email, mail or in person asking for any kind of information to complete their economic impact payment.

The IRS is sending these Economic Impact Payments automatically to retirees – no additional action or information is needed on a retiree’s part to receive the funds.

The IRS reminds retirees that scammers may: 

  • Use the words “Stimulus Check” or “Stimulus Payment.” The official term is “Economic Impact Payment.”
  • Ask the taxpayer to sign over their economic impact payment check to them.
  • Ask by phone, email, text or social media for verification of personal and/or banking information, saying that the information is needed to receive or speed up their economic impact payment.
  • Suggest that they can get an economic impact payment faster by working on the taxpayer’s behalf. This scam could be conducted by social media or even in person.
  • Mail the taxpayer a bogus check, perhaps in an odd amount, then tell the taxpayer to call a number or verify information online in order to cash it. 

Be on the Lookout for Scams

Taxpayers are urged to be on the lookout for a surge of calls from scammers and email phishing attempts about the Economic Impact Payments and the Coronavirus (COVID-19). These contacts can lead to tax-related fraud and identity theft.

The IRS will not call taxpayers asking to verify or provide financial information so they can receive an economic impact payment.

This also applies to surprise emails that appear to be coming from the IRS. Remember, never open an email or click on attachments or links you cannot independently verify.

Taxpayers should watch not only for emails but text messages, websites and social media attempts that request money or personal information.

Reporting Coronavirus-Related or Phishing Attempts

Those who receive unsolicited emails, text messages or social media attempts to gather information that appear to be from either the IRS or an organization closely linked to the IRS, such as the Electronic Federal Tax Payment System (EFTPS), should forward it to [email protected].

Taxpayers are encouraged not to engage potential scammers online or on the phone. Learn more about reporting suspected scams by going to the Report Phishing and Online Scams page on IRS.gov.

Those who receive unsolicited emails, text messages or social media attempts to gather information that appear to be from either the IRS or an organization closely linked to the IRS, such as the Electronic Federal Tax Payment System (EFTPS), should forward it to [email protected].

For more information about the Economic Impact Payments and for updates on the launch of the “Get My Payment” app, visit IRS.gov visit and Treasury.gov/CARES.

The Consumer Finance Protection Bureau also has published a Frequently Asked Questions guide on the stimulus Economic Impact Payments.